Apple Walnut French Toast

Apple Walnut French Toast

Yes I know that everyone is eating healthy and looking for healthy recipes, but I also know that everyone needs a cheat day. Breakfast is the best food of all, so you should cheat with this recipe. At least I did because – can you really say no to soft and chewy, warm, sticky sweet, crunchy French toast fresh out of the oven?

Today’s recipe is extra easy for the user. You can prep the french toast the night before and place it in the fridge until the morning. Who wants to wake up extra early to make a meal? As much as I try to be a good southern wife, sometimes it is not always possible. With this recipe wake up late and throw on some coffee while you bake the bread.

It is just as delicious if you make it the same day. The last time I prepared it I threw it together in a flash the morning of for a late Saturday morning breakfast.

Apple is added for its natural sweetness and walnuts for the earthy crunch. French toast always need some texture to make it truly delicious. Whipped cream is option for this one, but the cinnamon is not. You cannot bake an apple without cinnamon.

Per usual, with this recipe you can substitute whatever you like. Take out the walnuts and replace the apple with blueberry. Use pecans to make the dish extra southern. The breakfast possibilies are bountiful.

Check out this varation to breakfast

 

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Muscadine & Ricotta on Rye

Muscadine & Ricotta on Rye

Do you know what a muscadine is? It is okay if the answer is no, considering most southerners would answer the same.

My childhood included a giant muscadine vine in the back yard, and most years it produced plethora of the juicy fruits. We had so much fruit growing in the backyard, my mother and I even tried our hand at making muscadine wine. It may have turned out a little on the vinegary side.

A muscadine is the south’s version of a grape but gooier and a bit more tart. They are in season right now and can be found by the carton full at your local farmer’s market. I naturally scooped up more than I could reasonably use in one recipe because finding them inspired me to create.

You can eat them like a grape, but after years of tasting the unique fruit, I can advise you that straight off the vine is not the best option. Roasting them at a high temperature breaks down some of the fibrous material and subdues the chewy fruit. It also adds to the overall flavor since by roasting you are caramelizing the natural sugars.

You can do a lot with a raw or roasted muscadine, but for this years bounty a muscadine toast sounded like an interesting option. A quick call to one of my all-time favorite Savannah restaurants, Cotton & Rye, and I scored a gigantic warm loaf of fresh baked rye bread.

The last ingredient I selected to round out the flavors was fresh, creamy ricotta with a squeeze of lemon.

I think you will find this recipe simple, unique, and quite delicious. Since muscadines are so unique and often difficult to find, I would love to hear you ideas on how to use the fruit.

For another childhood southern recipe click here.