Boiled Peanut Hummus

Boiled Peanut Hummus

For this post, you get a very short and simple recipe. This recipe that I love and go back to time and time again, so just because it is easy does not mean it is not delicious. I also wanted to share with you a savory recipe, which I feel as though I so rarely do.

Boiled peanuts are about as southern as it comes, and if you have never tasted them I am truly sad for you. For many southerners boiled green peanuts, although the concept of are one of those snacks that we turn to time and time again. Stop in almost any gas or this post, you get a very short and simple recipe. This recipe that I love and go back to time and time again; however, just because it is easy does not mean it is not delicious. I also wanted to share with you a savory recipe, which I feel as though I so rarely do.

Boiled peanuts are about as southern as it comes, and if you have never tasted them I am truly sad for you. For many southerners boiled green peanuts are one of those snacks that we turn to time and time again. Stop in almost any gas station below the mason Dixon, and you can grab a cup of hot (maybe not so fresh) boiled peanuts. On the short drive to Tybee Island from Savannah, there is a stop to get fresh steaming hot boiled peanuts, and let me tell you there is nothing better than sitting on the beach eating salty peanuts with an ice cold Coke. I even served boiled peanuts as a passed hors d’oeuvre at my wedding alongside pimento cheese sandwiches.

Often times our eyes are much bigger than our stomach, and we buy a bag that is too large to consume. Instead of letting the extra peanuts go to waste, I use them up replacing garbanzo beans with boiled peanuts in my hummus recipe. The result is something salty and delicious, perfect for scooping up with a toasted triangle of white bread.

I use this recipe time and time again because it is one of those dishes that your friends rave about when you bring it to a party or tailgate. When I am feeling extra fancy, and southern, I love to put a jar of the hummus on a platter next to homemade pimento cheese, bacon jam, and my pickled vegetables.

For those of you that have never tried boiled peanuts, I hope this recipe pushes you to step out of your comfort zone, or at a minimum inspires you to create something totally new from an everyday classic recipe.
I included red pepper in the recipe, which is optional. If you are like me and like a little kick, then add it. The hummus is just as delicious without it, so use however much you like.

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Boiled Peanut Hummus

Category: appetizer, dip, hummus

Cuisine: American

Boiled Peanut Hummus

Ingredients

  • 4 Cups of Shelled Boiled Peanuts
  • 2 Cloves of Garlic, peeled
  • 1 Teaspoon of Salt
  • 1/2 Cup of Tahini
  • 1/2 Cup of Olive Oil, plus more as needed
  • 1/2 Teaspoon of Red Pepper in the powered form, optional

Instructions

  1. In a food processor, combine your shelled peanuts, garlic cloves, salt, tahini, olive oil, and red pepper if you like.
  2. Blend on medium until everything is combined and broken up. The consistency will not be totally smooth.
  3. If the mixture is too thick, add as much olive oil as necessary to get the hummus to the consistency you like.
  4. Store in a sealable container until ready to serve.
  5. Serve with vegetables of your choice, or toasted slices of white bread.
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https://epicuropedia.com/2018/08/15/boiled-peanut-hummus/
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Korean Cured Egg Yolks

Korean Cured Egg Yolks

When it comes to cooking, I am a believer in using every ingredient to the max. In my posts, I have often spoken of the difficulties in cooking for a home of two — especially being a Southerner with a large family who is used to eating large meals. The concepts of a meat and three and eating everything on your plate was instilled in me at a very young age.

Another southern part of me loves to keep a cake on the counter at all times, and my husband’s mother is the same way. With all of the baking I do, I so often have leftover egg yolks and nothing to do with them. For most, we think nothing of tossing the egg yolk into the sink after separating eggs for a mix. To be honest, I have done the same countless times, often without even blinking. Thinking back on it now, it is kind of silly to waste such a delicious fat-filled staple. Egg yolks are so versatile; they’re essentially nature’s mayonnaise. Personally I feel as though a runny egg can be eaten atop of almost any dish, taking a dish from normal to out of this world. So why would we throw away something so delicious?

All of that changes now. After reading up a bit on salt curing, a cooking technique that predates most, I thought why not apply this technique to my egg yolks. If you don’t know what curing is, it is a way to preserve food by applying salt.

Cured egg yolks, often time duck yolks, are popular with traditional Japanese cuisine.

The result of curing the yolk is a bit strange. The finished product is not runny, instead the texture of the yolk is that of a soft gummy. Many people treat the yolk as a soft cheese, grating it over a finished dish. The flavor is like a creamy umami salt bomb.

For my recipe, I wanted to expand on the idea of Asian cuisine, adding Korean chili powder known as Gochugaru. You can find it in any local asian grocery store.

As for the color of the yolks pictured, they are much more orange than those cured in a traditional salt cure. The chili powder adds a vibrant orange tint to the yolks.

Do not be scared of curing something. The process itself is rather foolproof. Simply tightly cover and let sit untouched in the fridge for one week.

Korean Cured Egg Yolks

Category: Recipes

Cuisine: Asian

Servings: 6

Korean Cured Egg Yolks

Ingredients

  • 6 Egg Yolks
  • 3 Cups of Salt
  • 3 Tablespoons of Korean Chili Powder
  • 1 Tablespoon of Garlic Powder
  • 1 Tablespoon of Sugar

Instructions

  1. In a mixing bowl combine together salt, pepper, garlic, and sugar.
  2. In a sealable container (at least 8x8), pour 2/3 of the mixture into an even layer on the bottom of the container.
  3. Create six indentions in the mixture, large enough to nest an egg yolk.
  4. Gently place each egg yolk into each indention, being careful not to break.
  5. Gently pour, preferable with your fingers, the remaining 1/3 salt mixture over each egg yolk. Be sure each egg yolk is fully covered.
  6. Tightly cover and store in the fridge for one week.
  7. After one week, remove from the fridge.
  8. Gently rinse each yolk with water.
  9. Grate onto anything you want.
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https://epicuropedia.com/2018/07/01/korean-cured-egg-yolks/